Eggs Found Cracked On St Andrews Streets

Updated: Apr 11


During the weeks spanning late March to early April, the streets of St Andrews have been hit by a series of eggings. Most of these incidents occurred on North Street, Market Street and Union Street, with many victims noting that they were pursued within this area.


Egging is defined as the act of throwing eggs, typically raw, though occasionally hard-boiled, at people or property. This practice has been historically performed both recreationally and as a means of political protest. However, the latter motive seems unlikely in this instance, given the majority-student demographic of the affected victims.


Over the past week, The Saint sat down with several egging victims, both past and present, to discuss their experiences.


Fourth-year student Ilaria Bevan, was egged during a recreational walk with her friend. “We had walked down Market [Street] and had gone up by Buchanan and we kind of heard like a car but didn't really think anything of it,” she recalled.


The situation changed suddenly as the two walkers turned onto North Street, with Ms Bevan noting that she heard “some giggling.” She goes on to say that her next memory of the incident is that “something really hard hit the back of [her] knee.”


Ms Bevan felt fortunate that she escaped unharmed. “Luckily [the egg] didn’t break. It hit the back of my leg and didn’t do anything, it just smashed on the floor.”


She also notes that while she was “so shocked and so stunned,” she believes that the perpetrators needed “better aim” and suggested they partake in “baseball lessons” to remedy their poor technique.


Ms Bevan also confirmed The Saint’s suspicions that this was not an isolated instance of egging, as she witnessed numerous broken eggs on her subsequent journey home. “The whole way down North Street there were broken eggs everywhere,” she notes, and proceeds to liken the scene to “a chicken [that] had gone ham.”


The Saint also approached another shaken fourth-year student, Mairi Alice Dun, who was also present during this incident, for her perspective on the crime. “I heard giggles, then I saw the eggs.”


“They were male giggles,” Ms Dun clarifies. “I want to make that clear.”


Ms Dun also shared her thoughts on the possible motives behind the attack. “I felt fortunate [that] I’m not a practising vegan. I think this would have upset me more – maybe that was the point though.” She also added that this incident has discouraged her from pursuing veganism. “I wouldn’t feel safe in this town.”


Yet another fourth-year student, who wished to remain anonymous, contacted The Saint with his story. He was attacked on Abbey Walk at approximately 10pm, and notes that the perpetrators threw “a bunch” of eggs at himself and a coworker from a car. He added that the perpetrators “drove up and down a couple of times and threw eggs multiple times.” When questioned regarding the appearance of the vehicle, he stated that it was “possibly blue.”


This victim was alarmed by this event, stating that the incident was “legit frightening.” He also shared with The Saint his opinion on the act of egging, condemning it as “unfathomable degenerate behaviour.”


This incident has sparked debate within the student community, with an anonymous online commenter condemning it as a “cruel yolk [joke]” and another lauding it as “pure bants.” The recent publicity of these incidents prompted more students to contact The Saint with details of their eggings. Though these victims opted not to give official comment, these attacks were all very similar to the incidents recorded above.


This is not the first time St Andrews has been affected by eggings. Student Benjamin Heckmann shared with The Saint some details of his own egging, which occurred in 2019. He notes that he was “near DRA [David Russell Hall]” and “wearing a Halloween costume” at the time.


Mr Heckmann recalls that a raw egg “hit [his] friend's head and smashed on [his] stomach.” He also emphasised that the perpetrators were “yelling stuff [he] couldn't understand.”


If you believe that you or a loved one have been egged, please email us at editor@thesaint.scot.



Illustration: Kate Lau

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